Clovelly


Clovelly is a small beachside suburb in Sydney's eastern suburbs, located 8 kilometres south-east of the Sydney central business district. Clovelly is surrounded by the suburbs of Bronte in the north, Randwick in the west and Coogee in the south. Clovelly's housing is higher density than much of Australia with 70.9% of dwellings being units, flats, semi-detached, terrace houses or townhouses. The national average for these housing types is just 25.5%.

Transport: Major bus services operate along Clovelly Road and these bus services are the only form of public transport available to the suburb.

Clovelly Beach: UBD Map 257 Ref K 13. A small but popular sheltered beach at the head of a narrow cove. The bay is popular with swimmers. The bay is home to one of the first surf lifesaving clubs in the world, Clovelly Surf Life Saving Club, which was founded in 1906. A saltwater pool is situated on the southern shore of Clovelly Bay.

Surf Life Saving has been a predominate part of the culture and heritage of this scenic coastal suburb. Competitive swimming is also a dominate part of life in this idyllic coastal location. During the Great Depression Randwick Council instituted a scheme to keep unemployed men employed by building concrete foreshores for Clovelly in an attempt to make access to the bay s foreshores easier for bathers. The Council envisage an Olympic size swimming pool in the bay, a facility that would also keep local men employed in the worst financial times. It was also planned to build a causeway/scenic road across the entrance to the Bay but wild storms in 1938 dashed hopes of this. The remains of the causeway are still visible at low tide, forming a protective reef. The plans were controversial; the merits of this work are still debated today.

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Bondi to Coogee Walk


The Bondi to Coogee Walk (or coast walk) is a cliff top that offers a combination of beaches, parks and ocean views. Locals have been enjoying this walk since the 1930 s and is still one of the gems of Sydney s Eastern Suburbs. The walk features stunning views, beaches, parks, cliffs, bays and rock pools. The beaches and parks offer a place to rest, swim or a chance to eat at one of the cafes, hotels, restaurants or takeaways. All beaches offer picnic shelters, electric barbecues, play areas, kiosks, toilets and change-rooms. The walk is not difficult, there are medium gradient paths and several staircases with occasional seating. It takes about two hours to complete the Bondi to Coogee Beach section of the walk and another hour and a half if you choose to continue to Maroubra.

The Bondi to Tamarama walk is the venue for the Sculpture by the Sea ,Tamarama Beach and Mackenzie s Point is a favorite with surfers and Bronte Beach is popular with families. A board walk takes you past Waverley Cemetery, the most scenic burial ground in the world. Swim snorkel or dive at Clovelly Beach and Gordon s Bay. Enjoy the cafes and Wylie s Bath at Coogee. If you like you can continue to Maroubra Beach via the Lurline Bay wetlands. Make sure you wear comfy shoes, bring a hat, sunglasses, sun screen and water.

Highlights: Bondi, Tamarama, Bronte and Coogee beaches; Mackenzies Point Aboriginal rock art site.
Duration: 2 hours.
Distance: 6km.
Grade: easy/moderate

Waverley Cemetery


Waverley Cemetery is one of Australia s most well known, iconic burial grounds. Located on top of the cliffs at Bronte in the eastern suburbs of Sydney, it is noted for its largely intact Victorian and Edwardian monuments.

Waverley Cemetery was opened in 1877 on the site of an old horse tram terminus. It contains the graves of many famous Australians, including Reuben Uther, one time owner of Sydney's Imperial Arcade; W.H. Paling, founder of the Paling's music shops; Lt-Col George Johnston of Annandale who arrested Gov. Bligh in the Rum Rebellion; Fanny Durack, who was the first Australian woman to win an Olympic Gold Medal (1912); aeronautics pioneer Lawrence Hargrave; and New South Wales Premier Sir James Martin, (whose remains were transferred to Waverley Cemetery after the death of his wife in 1909). Martin Place in the Central Business District is named in his honour.

Waverley Cemetery contains the graves of many literary figures such as Henry Lawson, (one of Australia's most famous poets), Jules Archibald, founder of The Bulletin and benefactor of the Archibald Prize, nineteenth century poet Henry Kendall, writer Robert Quinn, the American actor William E. Sheridan, and poet and author Dorothea Mackellar.



The cemetery contains over 200 war graves from various past conflicts, of which there are 129 registered and maintained by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (over 100 from World War I and nearly 20 from World War II). The front gates are a memorial to the residents of the area who died during World War I and World War II. Inside the main gates is a memorial to the military forces of NSW which houses the remains of several officers killed in an 1891 sea mine explosion at Middle Head. At least eleven United States Civil War veterans are also buried at Waverley, including Phineas S. Thompson. In addition, the cemetery is home to the The Irish Martyrs  memorial, the final resting place of Michael Dwyer (1798 Rebellion), a memorial to those who died in the Fenian Rising of 1867 and a memorial stone commemorating the 1981 Hunger Strikers. As well as nationally famous figures the cemetery contains the graves of notable Sydney identities including Robert 'Nosey Bob' Howard, the state's first salaried executioner who served until 1904, and Sydney crime figure George Freeman.

Architecturally, Waverley Cemetery is significant in that it showcases examples of Stonemasonry and funerary art dating back from the 19th century with features such as the gates, buildings and fencing that due to their intact nature are considered of outstanding aesthetic value . Included in this is a tomb designed for James Stuart and his family by the architects J Burcham Clamp and Walter By Griffin.


Grave of Sir James Martin, Premier of New South Wales, 1866-68; 1870-72.

The cemetery has been a place of inspiration for many artists, Henry Lawson who ultimately ended up there was fond of using the location in his stories, either as direct reference or indirectly. It has also appeared in numerous feature films. The earliest known motion picture filmed at the cemetery was the 1977 Italian production La Ragazza dal pigiama giallo , also known as The Pyjama Girl Case , a murder story based on the true story of Linda Agostini, the Pyjama Girl. In 1979 the cemetery was a location in filming of the movie Tim starring Mel Gibson. Baywatch used the cemetery while filming its Australian movie length episode, and the Australian series Home and Away buried one of their characters at Waverley in 2004. In 1996, scenes from the season one final of Australian TV show Water Rats were filmed at the cemetery. Notable recent films include Dirty Deeds. It was also pictured in the Bollywood Blockbuster Dil Chahta Hai in a musical sequence.

Highlights: Bondi, Tamarama, Bronte and Coogee beaches; Mackenzies Point Aboriginal rock art site.
Duration: 2 hours.
Distance: 6km.
Grade: easy/moderate

Clovelly fortifications



Installed in 1893 as part of Sydney's coastal defence system, the fortifications housed a 22-tonne breach loading gun which had to be dragged through the bush from the Victoria Barracks to the site by a team of horses. Location: Shark Point, Burrows Park, Clovelly.

Wedding Cake Island



More of a rocky reef than an island, Wedding Cake Island protrudes above sea level in the Pacific Ocean off Coogee. It is also known as Lemo's Island. The most probable source of the name is the shape of the island - it resembles a wedding cake. Another theory is that bird droppings on the island gave the appearance of icing on a cake. Apparently the island was also formerly called Gingerbread Island. In 1975, Wedding Cake Island was the title of a popular surf music instrumental single by Australian rock music band Midnight Oil; the band's lead singer, Peter Garrett a local resident.

History of Clovelly

Originally known as Little Coogee, the name was changed to Clovelly in 1913. When the search for a new name began, the English seaside town Eastbourne, was suggested. The president of the local progress association, Mr F H Howe, suggested Clovelly, the name of a local estate owned by Sir John Robertson, which was named for the village of Clovelly on the north Devon coast, England.

William C. Greville bought 20 acres (81,000 m2), which included the whole bay frontage, for 40 pounds in 1834. The area was dominated during the nineteenth century by the grand estate of Mundarrah Towers. Mundarrah Towers was built for Dr Dickson in the 1860s. Samuel Bennett, who owned Australian Town and Country Journal, one of the most influential newspapers of the day, bought the property and made further grand additions. The Towers was demolished in 1926, to make way for suburban development. The Mundarrah Towers estate occupied the land around Burnie Street overlooking the western end of Clovelly Bay. Mundarrah Street honours this once grand part of Clovelly s heritage. Between Coogee and Clovelly, on the shores of Gordon s Bay, stood Cliffbrook, the home built for John Thompson. By the early twentieth century the first governor of the Commonwealth Bank owned this grand mansion that was demolished in 1976. Cliffbrook and Mundarrah Towers are both part of the hidden heritage of our northern coastal suburbs.

Major subdivisions for domestic housing commenced in earnest in Clovelly in 1909. The local progress association argued that there were 717 houses constructed within metres of the proposed tram route that had not yet been completed. Due to these lobbying efforts, the tram-line to Clovelly was completed between 1912-1913. This allowed Clovelly to continue developing throughout the 1920s. Clovelly s heyday was really between the end of the First World War and the early 1930s. During the Great Depression Randwick Council instituted a scheme to keep unemployed men employed by building concrete foreshores for Clovelly in an attempt to make access to the bay s foreshores easier for bathers. The Council envisage an Olympic size swimming pool in the bay, a facility that would also keep local men employed in the worst financial times. It was also planned to build a causeway/scenic road across the entrance to the Bay but wild storms in 1938 dashed hopes of this. The remains of the causeway are still visible at low tide, forming a protective reef. The plans were controversial; the merits of this work are still debated today.

In 1907, a surf life saving brigade was formed at Clovelly, inaugurating the surf life saving tradition in this suburb that has seen numerous heroic rescues, perhaps most notably "the rescue off Schnapper" or "the big rescue" of Sunday 4th December 1927. Surf Life Saving has been a predominate part of the culture and heritage of this scenic coastal suburb. Competitive swimming is also a dominate part of life in this idyllic coastal location.

Today the suburb is affectionately referred to as "Cloey" by many residents and locals.




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